Learn something new every day.

 

PeopleScience is headed by Editor-In-Chief Jeff Kreisler, the bestselling author – with Dan Ariely – of Dollars and Sense: How We Misthink Money and How to Spend Smarter. Listed as one of the top business books of 2017 by, among others, Business Insider, Huffington Post, Audible and The Washington Post – who called it “a brilliant and accessible look at behavioral economics” – Jeff is also a financial columnist (TheStreet.com), recovering attorney (Princeton, Virginia Law), award-winning comedian (“Laugh out loud, roaring” – CNBC, “Hilarious” – Chicago Tribune, “Delectable” – New York Times) and on-air pundit for MSNBC, CNN Headline News, FoxNews and Sirius/XM.

Where did the idea for PeopleScience come from?

Behavioral science is really having a moment, as more and more businesses look to the potential of this field of study as a way to transform their industry, from design and marketing to employee engagement, incentives, rewards and more. I’ve seen the approaching tipping point and I want to help push the world over the edge and into the arms of scientific progress.
As publication of my recent book (Dollars And Sense: How We Misthink Money and How to Spend Smarter) approached, I wanted to capitalize on the momentum of working with one of the very top minds in the field of behavioral science, my co-author Dan Ariely. As it happens, Dan knew a company that wanted to start a thought leadership platform around behavioral science but couldn’t find any good candidates to run it.

We connected, and we made PeopleScience, a website, social channels, live events… a thought leadership destination for academics as well as business professionals who’ve either dabbled in applying behavioral science or those who have no idea where to start. We’re here to move the conversation, and the possibilities, forward.

What does your typical day look like and how do you make it productive?

I don’t really have a typical day, which is a challenge… but one I embrace (and the reason I could never have a regular job – I turned down $125K partner track law jobs at age 25 for this)! My days are an unpredictable mix of calls, researching, writing, performing, networking, budgeting, managing, production and thinking. The keys for me are to take notes and to leave large chunks of time – 90 minutes minimum – for creative and slow brain work.

How do you bring ideas to life?

Humor, perspective and understanding. And the patience to allow those to come together.

What’s one trend that excites you?

Besides IdeaMensch interviews? The curiosity about, and embrace of, behavioral principles in business, especially as we move beyond the early adopter phase and into broad, cross-disciplinary acceptance.

What is one habit of yours that makes you more productive as an entrepreneur?

Taking short breaks – usually walks – between tasks so my mind can unclench and release the emotions of the just completed moment and become open to the next opportunity.

What advice would you give your younger self?

Dress better, master a musical instrument and the winning PowerBall numbers on March 13, 2009 were…

Tell us something that’s true that almost nobody agrees with you on.

You CAN teach an old dog new tricks.

As an entrepreneur, what is the one thing you do over and over and recommend everyone else do?

Learn something new every day.

What is one strategy that has helped you grow your business?

Collaboration with peers and competitors. Rather than trying to beat them, working with them, showcasing them and helping them elevates all of us in a relatively new field.

What is one failure you had as an entrepreneur, and how did you overcome it?

Just one? I spent many years in show business, I have hundreds. One time, the Game Show Network asked me to pitch ideas related to my first book, Get Rich Cheating. I put together some treatments and passed them to the agent who introduced us. He sat on them. I didn’t know why. I called him and asked. He said he just hadn’t gotten around to it. I said, “Well, let me play Devil’s Advocate…” and he cut me off and yelled, “I am the devil!” Then he hung up. The pitches never got delivered. I never got the show. I have not overcome it. I just moved on to the next opportunity.

What is one business idea that you’re willing to give away to our readers?

A refrigerator / snack drawer with a monitor that displays a picture of yourself in the future, your kids, x-rays, beaches… whatever future triggered image will help you make healthy diet choices.

What is the best $100 you recently spent? What and why?

House cleaning – oh, I also have kids, so I just, I don’t have time – and another back up hard drive – 87% of my professional life is store on my computer, can’t risk losing it, can gain peace of mind.

What is one piece of software or a web service that helps you be productive? How do you use it?

Trello. I use it to manage content and publication schedule.

What is the one book that you recommend our community should read and why?

Zen and the Art of Stand Up Comedy“. Understanding how to make people laugh is a back door into understanding how people think and how they feel.

What is your favorite quote?

Don’t forget to look up” – my college roommate
So it goes” – Kurt Vonnegut
Don’t believe everything you think” – me

Key learnings:

• Overwhelmed multi-taskers must take breaks to allow for slow brain time and adjustment between tasks.
• Learn something new every day.
• Behavioral science is at a tipping point. It’s about to be embraced by businesses of all sorts to solve all kinds of problems. It’s an exciting time!

Connect:

Jeff Kreisler on Twitter: @jeffkreislerBS